Join us for a Webinar on October 15th

Dr. Bobbie C. Sutton, Medical Director of The Medical Foundation's Flow Cytometry and Molecular Pathology department, will host a webinar entitled, "Update for Solid Tumor Molecular Testing."  The webinar will be geared toward oncologists, primary care physicians, interventional radiologists and hospital support staff employees who currently use The Medical Foundation for laboratory services or are interested in this topic.

"Update for Solid Tumor Molecular Testing" will focus on the implementation of our new Sequenom MassARRAY instrument, which will simultaneously determine 100+ mutations in tumor driver genes such as KRAS, NRAS, EGFR, BRAF and KIT.  These mutations are important for patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung or colon, and melanoma, where they may impact patient decisions. 

Dr. Sutton will introduce our newly updated test menu and will discuss the appropriate test panel selections for different patient groups.

Reserve your webinar seat today by registering here.

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Information regarding pre-authorization forms

Information regarding pre-authorization forms

In an effort to reduce denial of payments from third party payers for tests requiring prior authorization, The Medical Foundation is requesting that physicians complete a prior authorization form for patients before sending them for Genetic/Molecular testing.  

If you have any questions regarding authorizations or about which tests need a prior authorization, please contact Terri Otis, Reimbursement Manager at The Medical Foundation at totis@sbmf.org or call 574.234.4176 *65598.

Please refer to this listing of Genetic/Molecular tests that require prior authorization.
 

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September is National Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Month

September is National Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Month

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has impacted the lives of 90,000-100,000 people in the United States.  While many people think that only African Americans or blacks are vulnerable to the disease, that isn’t quite true.  Sickle Cell Disease impacts those with ancestors from South American, Central America, Mediterranean Countries, India, the Caribbean and Saudi Arabia. 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 500 black births results in a Sickle Cell Disease birth and 1 in 36,000 Hispanic births resulting in the same. Sickle Cell Disease cannot be caught, it is hereditary and therefore, children are born with it.

Sickle Cell Disease occurs when red blood cells become hard and sticky and form a c-like, or crescent shape, like that of the farm tool, referred to as a “sickle.”

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